Yearly Archives: 2013


Humor, movies, songs and lots of Spanish: “Mucha Guasa”

Last week, a friend and I launched Mucha Guasa (‘Much Banter’) an educational page intending to teach Spanish in a fun way.

A daily video of my friend singing or performing a line from a song or a movie translated into Spanish, which you, my dear Spanish lovers / learners can try to guess which movie or song he is performing.

Accompanying those highly entertaining videos, and contributing to the educational side, it’s me explaining some grammar point or idiom appearing in the translation.

Fun? Lots. Here is just an example of him singing.

Learning? Of course! So far, we have seen the use of the intensifier “demasiado / demasiada”, the “future simple”, the use of “ya” and “ya no” and the use of “como” as an adverb of manner, and we only launched last Wednesday!

Like us and start having fun while learning Spanish for free every day.


False Friends (I): “to realize” in Spanish

In this short post you will learn how to translate the verb “to realize” in Spanish. This is a false friend in Spanish, because we have the verb “realizar” but it’s nothing alike “to realize”.

falsefriends1

To realize ➠ ‘darse cuenta’

Realizar ➠ ‘to make, accomplish’

See? Not the same.

Now, look at this sentence:

– I didn’t realize Elisa was in the party.

How would you translate it into Spanish?

– No realicé que Elisa estaba en la fiesta. ——> Wrong! 🙁
– No me di cuenta que Elisa estaba en la fiesta. ——> Right! 🙂

So, remember:

“To realize” in English means “darse cuenta de algo” in Spanish. Whereas “realizar” means “to make”.


Comprensión oral – #1

This is one of the latest activities I made for my advanced students in Spanish. You can practice your Spanish listening comprehension with it. Just watch the video and answer the questions below.

¡Buena suerte!

________________________________________________________________

Mira el video y responde a las siguiente preguntas.

[wpsqt name=”Primavera con espinas” type=”quiz”]

 

Hey, pssst, how did it go? 


Suggest, accept and refuse plans

Suggest plans

How useful is it to find the ways to propose, accept and refuse plans? In this post you will learn how to do exactly that.

There are several ways of suggesting plans. Here I’ll show you few:

– ¿Porqué no vamos a la playa mañana?
– Why don’t we go to the beach tomorrow?

– ¿Te apetece ir al cine?
– Do you fancy going to the cinema?

– ¿Quieres visitar el Museo del Prado esta mañana?
– Do you want to visit Museo del Prado this morning?

– ¿Y si vamos a cenar a este restaurante esta noche?
– What if we go to that restaurant tonight?

Podemos ir a casa de Pedro.
– We can go to Pedro’s place.

– Oye, ¿quedamos mañana para jugar al tenis?
– Hey, do we meet to play tennis 
tomorrow?

– ¿Nos vemos luego?
– See you later?

– ¿Qué tal si vamos a casa de Pedro?
– What about going to Pedro’s house?

– ¿Qué te parece si nos quedamos en casa hoy?
– What about staying at home tonight?

As you can see, it’s important to know the conjugation of the verb “poder” (‘can’), “apetecer” (‘feel like + -ing’ / ‘fancy’) and “querer” (‘want’) and “quedar” (‘arrange to meet someone’ remember “quedarse” and “quedar” are not the same, as I explained in this post).

 Accept plans (Aceptar)

To accept a plan that has been suggested to us, we can say:

Vale. (Ok)

De acuerdo. (Alright)

Bien. (Fine)

Refuse plans (Rechazar)

Whereas to refuse the plan we have been suggested, we can say:

No, lo siento, no me apetece. (No, I’m sorry, I don’t feel like it.)

No puedo. (No, I can’t.)


The most common phrasal verbs in Spanish, oh the joy! 1

Just as the English language has its phrasal verbs that cause so many headaches to the poor learners of English, Spanish has a quite nice list of phrasal verbs too.

Phrasal verbs in Spanish = Perífrasis

But first, what is a phrasal verb? It’s a combination of two verbs, one fully conjugated, called helper verb because it doesn’t keep its usual meaning, and another verb in a non-personal form (infinitive, gerund or participe), which provides the main meaning of the phrasal verb.

Helper verb (conjugated) + Main verb (infinitive/gerund/participe)

– Yo suelo trabajar los fines de semana.
– I usually work on weekends.

Sometimes, both verbs are linked by a preposition.

Vamos a salir esta noche.
– We are going to go out tonight.

One of the most used phrasal verbs in Spanish would be “ir a + infinitivo” (‘to be going to’) used to talk about future plans and “tener que + infinitivo” (‘have to’) which express obligation and necessity, but there are others, let’s see some:

  • estar + gerundio (‘to be doing something’)

– No puedo salir ahora, estoy estudiando para el examen del martes.
– I can’t go out now, I’m studying for Tuesday’s exam.

  • seguir + infinitivo (‘to continue to do something’)

– Laura sigue trabajando para la empresa.
– Laura continues working for the entreprise.

  • llevar + participio (‘to have done something’)

Llevo escritas 200 páginas de mi tesis.
– I have written 200 pages of my thesis.

  • llevar + gerundio (‘to lead to do something’)

–  ¡Llevo haciendo dieta durante 3 semanas y aún no he perdido ni un kilo!
– 
I have been going on a diet for 3 weeks and I haven’t lost a kilo yet!

  • empezar a + infinitivo (‘to begin to do something’)

– Mi padre ha empezado a pintar mi retrato.
– My father has begun to paint my portrait.

  • ponerse a + infinitivo (‘to start to do something’)

Me tengo que poner a estudiar para el examen del martes. ¡Es pasado mañana!
– I have to start to study for Tuesday’s exam. It’s the day after tomorrow!

  • deber + infinitivo (‘to have to do something’)

Debéis leer El Quijote este verano.
– You have to read El Quixote this summer.

  • terminar de + infinitivo (‘to finish doing something’)

– No hemos terminado de limpiar los cristales todavía.
– We haven’t finished cleaning the windows yet.

  • poder + infinitivo (‘to be able to do something’)

– No puedo ver la tele y estudiar al mismo tiempo.
– I am not able to watch the T.V and study at the same time.

  • soler + infinitivo (‘to do something usually’)

– Los novios suelen bailar juntos después del banquete de boda.
– The bride and the groom usually dance together after the wedding reception.

  • tener que + infinitivo (‘to have to do something’)

Tienes que comer más frutas y verduras.
– You have to eat more fruit and vegetables.

  • acabar de + infinitivo (‘to have just done something’)

Acababa de salir de casa cuando empezó a llover.
– I had just left the house when it started to rain.